Implementation Guide

© Minister of Public Works and Government Services of Canada

Cat. no. HR21-79/1-2012E-PDF

ISBN 978-1-100-20002-6


How to Use this Guide

This guide is designed to inform organizations about the Human Rights Maturity Model (HRMM) and to provide a step-by-step approach to its implementation. The guide is designed for those developing and implementing human rights practices and policies in an organization, from the organization’s leaders, employee associations and unions, to managers and individual employees, as well as those interested in learning how to make progress in this area.

Part I – Introduction provides general information on the purpose of the HRMM and whom it can benefit.

Part II – Overview of the HRMM describes the components of the framework and briefly explains the Model’s levels, elements, outcomes and indicators. This section also describes the HRMM process.

Part III – HRMM Maturity Levels provides a level-by-level description of outcomes and indicators.

Part IV – HRMM Implementation Process describes how to apply the Model in an organization.

Related Documents

Human Rights Maturity Model Self-Assessment Workbook

Human Rights Maturity Model Fact Sheets


TABLE OF CONTENT

Preface

Acknowledgements

PART I: INTRODUCTION

Background.

1.1Creating a Culture of Human Rights

1.2 What is a Maturity Model?

The Human Rights Maturity Model

1.3 Purpose of the HRMM

1.4 Who can benefit from the HRMM?

PART II: OVERVIEW OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS MATURITY MODEL

Underlying Assumptions of the HRMM

HRMM Structure

2.1 Levels

2.2 Elements

2.3 Outcomes

2.4 Indicators

2.5 Resource Materials

PART III: MATURITY LEVELS

HRMM CONTINUUM

HRMM MATURITY LEVELS

Level 1 Initiated

Element:  Leadership and Accountability

Element: Communication and Consultation

Element: Alignment of Policies and Processes

Element: Capacity Building and Resources

Element: Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement

Level 2 – Defined

Element:  Leadership and Accountability

Element: Communication and Consultation

Element: Alignment of Policies and Processes

Element: Capacity Building and Resources

Element: Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement

Level 3 – Managed and Routine

Element:  Leadership & Accountability

Element: Communication and Consultation

Element: Alignment of Policies and Processes

Element: Capacity Building and Resources

Element: Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement

Level 4 – Predictable and Sustainable

Element:  Leadership and Accountability

Element: Communication and Consultation

Element: Alignment of Policies and Processes

Element: Capacity Building and Resources

Element: Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement

Level 5 – Continuously Optimized

Element:  Leadership & Accountability

Element: Communication and Consultation

Element: Alignment of Policies and Processes

Element: Capacity Building and Resources

Element: Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement

PART IV: HRMM IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS

HRMM Implementation

Senior Leadership Commitment

HRMM Steering Team and/or Working group

Initial Self-Assessment and Gap Analysis

Developing an Action Plan

Implementation and Planning for Continuous Improvement

APPENDIX A

APPENDIX B


Preface

An environment where human rights are integrated into daily practice, where every individual feels respected and equal; and where all can make for themselves the careers that they are able and wish to have, free from discrimination.

Jennifer Lynch, Q.C.

Chief Commissioner 
Canadian Human Rights Commission

The Canadian Human Rights Commission (the Commission) believes that respect for human rights is valuable in and of itself, and that widespread respect for these rights is a mark of a healthy, mature and prosperous society. The reality of achieving a human rights culture in the workplace lies with the employers and stakeholders. To help organizations foster and sustain such a culture, the Commission developed a Human Rights Maturity Model (HRMM).

The HRMM is a business-management tool designed to support organizational change. It outlines a collaborative, proactive, step-by-step approach to increasing awareness of, and respect for, human rights inside and outside the workplace. Although the HRMM is completely voluntary, it can help organizations meet their obligations under laws such as the Canadian Human Rights Act (CHRA)and the Employment Equity Act (EEA).

The HRMM can help organizations create a workplace culture characterized by a fundamental respect for human rights. These organizations can also become agents for change in society. Ultimately, it is every citizen’s and every organization’s responsibility to respect and promote human rights.

The Commission leads the administration of the CHRA and ensures compliance with the EEA. The CHRA prohibits discrimination on the grounds of race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, family status, disability and conviction for which a pardon has been granted. The EEA promotes equality in the workplace for the four designated groups: women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities.

The focus of the HRMM is to provide assistance to employers in both of these critical areas to, at a minimum, meet their basic statutory requirements. The HRMM’s goal is to bring the organization a step further. This is done through leadership, where there is a clear commitment to a culture change within their organization. This commitment will then have an effect on all units of the organization, where all the employees will feel part of a respectful and inclusive environment. This will help build the relationships these employees have with their counterparts inside and outside of the organization. Only then will we have created a truly integrated human rights culture for the entire organization.


Acknowledgements

The HRMM is the result of a collaborative initiative between the Commission and organizations within the private and public sectors. The Commission thanks all those who have assisted in its development: the Employer Advisory Council, the HRMM Steering Committee, the HRMM Working Group, and the pilot test organizations.

The HRMM benefited from the guidance and commitment of all parties which provided a forum for advising on content, success and continuous improvement.

Employer Advisory Council members:

·  Bell Canada

·  Canada Border Services Agency

·  Canada Post Corporation

·  Canadian Forces

·  Canadian Pacific Railway

·  National Bank of Canada

·  Purolator

·  Royal Canadian Mounted Police

·  Servisair/GlobeGround

·  WestJet Airlines

Steering Committee members:

·  Canadian Bankers Association

·  Canadian Labour Congress

·  Employer Advisory Council

·  Federally Regulated Employers in Transportation and Communications

·  Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

·  Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

The HRMM Working Group was established by the Steering Committee to help draft the performance measure framework for the HRMM and provide input into the HRMM’s outcomes, indicators, and data sources and measures.

Working Group members:

·  Bank of America

·  Bank of Montreal

·  Canadian Auto Workers

·  Canada Border Services Agency

·  Canadian Labour Congress

·  Canada Post Corporation

·  Canadian Bankers’ Association

·  Canadian Forces

·  Canadian Pacific Railway

·  Canadian Union of Postal Workers

·  Federally Regulated Employers in Transportation and Communications

·  Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

·  Public Service Alliance of Canada

·  Royal Canadian Mounted Police

·  Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada

Pilot Test Phase

The Commission ended its one-year pilot test phase of the HRMM in September 2011. Six federally regulated organizations, as well as the Commission tested the Model. These medium and large-sized organizations – from the private and public sectors and involving unionized and non-unionized employees – recognize the value of diversity, inclusiveness and respect in the modern workplace and have begun to reshape their environment by implementing policies and practices that promote these objectives.

Pilot test organizations:

·  Bell Aliant

·  Canada Post Corporation

·  Canadian Human Rights Commission

·  Farm Credit Canada

·  NAV CANADA

·  Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Thank you to all the pilot test organizations who led the way towards the progressive, respectful workplaces of the future!




Background

1.1     Creating a Culture of Human Rights

Respect for human rights in the workplace, at its most basic level, means ensuring that the principles of equal opportunity and non-discrimination are followed.

A true culture of human rights, however, is broader than fulfilling legal obligations. It is an environment where respect for human rights is integrated into daily activities; where all individuals are treated equally; where everyone can raise any issue and concern with confidence that it will be respectfully received and responsibly addressed; and where all can pursue careers of their choice or receive services, free from discrimination.

A growing focus of the Commission’s work is to guide employers toward a better understanding of, and commitment to, equality and dignity for every individual.

Doing the right thing is also good for business. There is a strong emerging business case for human rights, as a review of recent literature reveals:

Provides a significant competitive edge for an organization: Diversity initiatives can improve effectiveness, performance, innovation and group problem-solving, and create environments and practices for making differences work.[1]

Improves the recruitment and retention of employees: Attracting talent is a key factor in the success of any organization. Employers that successfully create a culture of human rights are more likely to recruit and retain employees reflecting the diversity of Canadian society.[2]

Sustains and enhances the image and reputation of an organization: An organization that is recognized as a leader in human rights is more attractive to a diverse range of clients and customers.[3]

Allows for better integration between human rights and employment equity functions: Integrating human rights and employment equity functions into daily business practices moves an organization more rapidly to a higher level of human rights maturity.

Reduces the risk of potentially costly litigation: Dealing proactively and effectively with human rights in the workplace can reduce the incidence, and associated costs, of human rights complaints and issues. The Commission believes that preventing discrimination is far more cost-efficient than reacting to it.

In a competitive labour market, workers will be more likely to choose an organization that respects its people, provides mechanisms for true employee engagement, fosters creativity, and encourages diverse ideas and approaches to conducting business.

1.2     What is a Maturity Model?

A relatively new innovation, maturity models are recognized as effective tools for organizational improvement. A maturity model is a structured approach to development and a framework for continuous organizational improvement that includes performance measures to track progress.

A maturity model is generally comprised of five different levels, which signify different stages of organizational maturity. While each level represents a developmental stage, the levels are best understood as steps toward organizational success.


The Human Rights Maturity Model

1.3     Purpose of the HRMM

The HRMM provides a roadmap to help foster and sustain a human rights culture in the workplace. The Commission developed the HRMM to provide an efficient and effective tool to help organizations move beyond mere compliance with statutory obligations and contractual/collective agreements to achieve a true human rights culture.

The HRMM is designed to promote the sharing of promising practices among like-minded organizations. The HRMM will help organizations achieve increasing levels of human rights and employment equity maturity and encourage culture change toward enhanced human rights practices in the workplace.

1.4     Who can benefit from the HRMM?

The Commission encourages all employers, large and small, from both private and public sectors, to make use of the HRMM. Federally regulated employers as well as all federal contractors who are required to sign a Certificate of Commitment to implement an employment equity program can benefit from the HRMM. Provincially regulated organizations can also make use of the Model by adapting it to the legislations that apply to them.

The HRMM is designed for those individuals and operational units within a workplace who manage and develop the workforce, and who can improve workforce practices. As such, it is likely to hold particular interest for senior management, program or unit managers, unions, and human resource staff and managers.




Underlying Assumptions of the HRMM

The HRMM helps organizations integrate respect for human rights[4] into all aspects of day-to-day activities. It serves as a roadmap to guide an organization’s efforts to achieve a workplace[5] that excels in human rights competencies.  Five assumptions underlie the HRMM:

1)    The HRMM is proactive. 

It is an aspirational model intended for organizations committed to progressing through all HRMM levels. 

2)    Leadership commitment is essential. 

Leadership includes management and union leaders along with informal leaders. Informed and visible leadership commitment is a key indicator of success at Level 1.

3)    Responsibilities and not accountabilities are delegated. 

Senior leadership is ultimately accountable for organizational change. Responsibility for specific activities, however, is delegated to other members of the organization.

4)    Human rights are everyone's responsibility. 

All members of an organization share responsibility for respecting human rights. 

5)    Get your house in order first. 

An organization's journey along the HRMM path begins with leadership, and then continues with the workforce[6], clients and stakeholders. The initial levels (1 and 2) of the HRMM focus inside an organization; level 3 is a transition phase; the higher levels (4 and 5) focus outside an organization, while maintaining internal success.

HRMM Structure

The HRMM consists of

·       Levels

·       Elements

·       Outcomes

·       Indicators

The HRMM also identifies potential sources of data and measures. 


2.1     Levels

The HRMM features five levels of maturity —stages in the development of an organization’s progress. These levels serve as benchmarks in a dynamic process of organizational change. As with all models, the HRMM simplifies what is often a series of complex issues and processes. Broadly speaking, Levels 1 to 3 focus on internal capacity and practices, while Levels 4 and 5 address external partners, stakeholders and the general public. 

Level 1: Initiated

The organization has taken initial steps to create a human rights culture in its workforce. The organization has committed to fostering a culture of human rights, responding to discrimination allegations and fulfilling its basic EEA requirements.

Level 2: Defined

The organization implements a structured approach to human rights matters for its workforce. The organization dedicates resources to address these matters, and incorporates human rights initiatives into its communications materials and practices, and performance measurement system.

Level 3: Managed and Routine

The organization recognizes the added value of a proactive approach to addressing human rights matters in its workforce and workplace. Responsibility for creating a human rights culture rests not only with human resources (or other designated resource) but also with operational units. The organization commits the required resources to identify, address and prevent human rights issues. 

Level 4: Predictable and Sustainable

The organization integrates human rights principles into its day-to-day operations and practices. All members of the organization have clear responsibilities for respecting human rights in the workforce and point-of-service areas. The organization has also established collaborative and productive working relationships related to human rights with various partners in business, government, employee associations and unions, and civil society.

Level 5: Continuously Optimizing

The organization has achieved a culture of human rights in its workforce and workplace. All members of the organization—from employees to managers to business partners— share responsibility for protecting and promoting human rights and preventing discrimination. The organization continually monitors its performance and enhances its culture to ensure that human rights are of primary consideration in day-to-day operations.  The organization also promotes human rights beyond its immediate interests. Human rights practices are entirely integrated into daily routines and business practices.


Progression through the levels

Organizations may demonstrate characteristics of more than one HRMM level at the same time, largely because of their diverse cultures, structures, capacities, practices and policies.  

An organization must meet the requirements of each outcome to attain a given level. This is true even if an organization achieves some of the outcomes and indicators of a higher level.

Each level enables an organization to establish the foundation needed to progress to the next level. As it progresses through the HRMM, an organization must continue to satisfy the outcomes and indicators of previous levels. For example, all the outcomes of levels 1 and 2 must remain completed for an organization to complete level 3.  

Organizations often require time to meet the outcomes and indicators of each level and implement the necessary practices and processes. This is particularly true for organizations with offices in multiple locations. 

2.2     Elements

Human rights involve many different aspects of an organization’s capacity, processes and activities. As a result, each level of the HRMM contains five elements that have been used to organize the model’s framework. 

Leadership and Accountability:

Leadership extends from the informal to the formal, and includes senior executives and all levels of management, as well as leaders of employee associations and unions. Leaders are accountable for change and serve as visible models and champions.

Communication and Consultation:

This element refers to how well an organization builds its commitment to human rights into its communication and consultation practices and policies. Clear communications will ensure that all employees understand the organization’s direction and focus. Active consultation with unions and employee associations will provide for a better understanding and success along the HRMM journey.

Alignment of Policies and Processes:

This element ensures that all policies, programs and practices are reviewed and aligned with human rights principles and viewed through a human rights lens.

Capacity Building and Resources:

This element relates to the competencies, human and financial resources, and information technology required to foster and maintain an organizational culture of human rights.

Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement:

This final element examines to what extent an organization undertakes regular, ongoing data collection and analysis—and acts on this analysis—to continuously improve its performance on human rights issues.


2.3     Outcomes

For each element, the HRMM includes a series of outcomes. Outcomes are the intended results of actions taken by the organization as it strives to develop a human rights culture. To attain a given level, an organization must achieve the outcomes associated with that level.

2.4     Indicators

Each outcome has corresponding indicators of achievement. Indicators are actions or behaviours demonstrating progress. The indicators help with an organization’s initial assessment and guide the planning of its activities.

2.5     Resource Materials

Self-Assessment Workbook: The self-assessment workbook is designed to help organizations undertake their initial HRMM self-assessment and begin to move forward on human rights.

Fact Sheets:Each indicator is linked to a fact sheet that provides data sources and possible measures. Some fact sheets have been elaborated to include implementation options, best practices and resources.

Both documents can be found on the Website under the following titles:

Human Rights Maturity Model Self-Assessment Workbook

Human Rights Maturity Model Fact Sheets




human rights maturity model chart this chart illustrates outcomes and indicators for each of the 5 levels of the human rights maturity model. level 1 outcomes include the following: senior leadership is committed to meeting the requirements of both the canadian human rights act and employment equity act, and to embarking on the maturity model journey; implementation begins on consultation and communication; legal responsibilities under the canadian human rights act are recognized; reporting on employment equity act requirements is initiated; organization has adequate capacity and resources to address level 1 indicators for each element and basic data collection begins. level 1 indicators include the following: senior leadership has made visible commitment to human rights culture change; the organization has released messaging that supports anti-discrimination and employment equity; the survey is completed and reporting requirements are met; senior leadership has received basic training on the canadian human rights act and employment equity act; basic quantitative human rights data collected. level 2 outcomes include the following: management engages in culture change; anti-discrimination and employment equity principles are built into mainstream communications; organizational and anti-discrimination/employment equity policies are implemented to achieve compliance with the objectives of the canadian human rights act and employment equity act; the organization has adequate capacity and resources to address level 2 indicators for each element and a human rights performance measurement system is in place. level 2 indicators include the following: human rights champions are identified within management; the organization has designated responsible officers for anti-discrimination and employment equity, and informed staff; existence of organizational anti-discrimination and employment equity policies; human rights training is tailored to specific staff roles and responsibilities; the organization has a data system for tracking discrimination complaints and employment equity requirements. level 3 outcomes include the following: management acts in accordance with its roles and responsibilities regarding human rights; the organization proactively communicates and consults regarding all aspects of human rights, including their impacts on workforce and workplace; a proactive, multi-disciplinary approach to human rights involving various sectors of organization is established; the organization has adequate capacity and resources to address level 3 indicators for each element; the organization is collecting qualitative data. level 3 indicators include the following: managers and supervisors are meeting performance objectives on human rights responsibilities; a communication strategy on human rights is designed and implemented to reach the whole organization; various organizational sectors, business groups and operational units are involved in fulfilling the employment equity implementation plan; all staff members are offered specialized training on human rights, regardless of their specific roles and responsibilities; the organization has a system to sustain data requirements of its employment equity plan. level 4 outcomes include the following: the organization understands and acts on its human rights roles and responsibilities; senior leadership ensures the organization has built relationships with external partners; all communications are seen through a human rights lens; regular and ongoing consultation with external partners to promote human rights principles; internal and external policies and practices reflect human rights; two-way continuous learning improves human rights practices; the organization has adequate capacity and resources to address level 4 indicators for each element; the organization is in a position to share its performance measurement practices with outside partners. level 4 indicators include the following: human rights concepts and principles incorporated in day-to-day activities of all staff members; appreciation for human rights and diversity built into and practiced by organizational communications; the organization ensures external policy and practices take human rights into account where applicable; the organization has established or is part of a network of external human rights communities and other resources and educational systems; the organization shares proven practices in evaluation with outside partners. level 5 outcomes include the following: senior leadership has initiated actions to demonstrate corporate social responsibility; all levels of the organization have responsibility for continuously improving human rights and employment equity practices within the organization; the organization promotes human rights broadly; the organization has policies and processes that foster human rights in areas beyond its mandate or economic interests; the organization has adequate capacity and resources to address level 5 indicators for each element; the organization has incorporated corporate social responsibility parameters into its own measurement system demonstrating that it promotes human rights broadly. level 5 indicators include the following: the organization promotes human rights principles externally; the organization has implemented initiatives to promote human rights broadly; the organization ensures it has policies, processes or initiatives to foster human rights beyond its immediate economic interests; the organization budgets for internal training on ethics and values, and for external promotion of human rights; the organization includes broader human rights parameters in its performance measurement framework.

Enlarge the chart

HRMM MATURITY LEVELS

The Model helps organizations create and sustain a workplace culture based on equality, dignity and respect. It is built around five levels and key elements that determine the “maturity” of an organization with regard to human rights competencies in the workplace. The elements are further defined by indicators which are actions or behaviours that demonstrate an organization’s progress.

Level 1 Initiated

The organization is considered to have fully reached this level if it has met all of the outcomes of Level 1.

LEVEL 1 FOCUS

The organization has taken initial steps to address human rights matters and create a human rights culture in its workforce and/or its point-of-service areas. The organization has articulated a commitment to fostering a culture of human rights, responding to discrimination allegations, and fulfilling its basic EEA requirements. Senior leadership recognizes the value of human rights and the four groups designated in the EEA and consults and communicates with employees, employee associations and/or union representatives) on the HRMM process. This gives expression to the organization’s commitment to culture change. The organization starts to establish the systems and allocates the resources required to comply with the CHRA and EEA, and to collect relevant data.

Element:  Leadership and Accountability

Outcome 1.   Senior leadership is committed to meeting the requirements of both the CHRAand EEA, and to embarking on the HRMM journey.

This outcome involves meeting the reporting requirements of the EEA, and committing to resolve human rights disputes according to the CHRA. Senior leadership recognizes the importance of the CHRA and EEA and their impact on the organization. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators:

INDICATORS

1a)Senior leadership has made a visible commitment to a human rights culture.

1b)Senior leadership has started to engage with employees/employee associations/unions to promote the change.

1c)Human resources personnel or other resources have been identified by the organization for dealing with discrimination complaints and employment equity.


Element: Communication and Consultation

Outcome 2.   Consultation and communication begins regarding anti-discrimination and employment equity matters.

This outcome refers to communicating a consistent message about respect for human rights in the workplace. At Level 1, the organization develops messages about human rights, employment equity and diversity, and aligns its consultation processes with the EEA. Senior leadership communicates its plans for culture change to all employees. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

2a)Organization has released messaging that supports anti-discrimination and employment equity to its employees.

2b)Discussions with employees/employee associations/ unions have occurred related to the handling process for complaints and collective agreement provisions.

2c)Communication and consultation with respect to conducting a legislated workforce survey required by the EEAhas taken place.

2d)Senior leadership encourages staff to undertake workforce survey.

Element: Alignment of Policies and Processes

Outcome 3.   Legal responsibilities under the CHRA are recognized and EEA reporting requirements are initiated.

The organization has the systems required to handle allegations of human rights abuse and to monitor complaints made to external groups, such as the Commission. The organization has begun to fulfill its obligations under the EEA by surveying its workforce to determine representation levels of the four designated groups and by reporting annually to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (private sector employers) or to Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada (public sector employers). The outcome is further defined by the following indicators:

INDICATORS

3a)Survey has been completed and reporting requirements are met.

3b)Informed response to discrimination grievances as specified under the collective agreement (if applicable) and complaints as specified under the CHRA are provided.

Element: Capacity Building and Resources

Outcome 4.   Organization has adequate capacity and resources to address Level 1 outcomes of each element.

The organization allocates the financial and human resources needed to meet its Level 1 HRMM outcomes. Training is available to help senior leadership and dedicated personnel meet their assigned responsibilities related to human rights initiatives and policies. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators:

INDICATORS

4a)Senior leadership has attended awareness sessions or presentations on the CHRA and the EEA.

4b)Organization has committed resources for dealing with discrimination complaints and employment equity.

4c)Resources committed for HRMM planning.

Element: Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement

Outcome 5.    Organization is collecting human rights basic data.

The organization creates and maintains databases to track representation levels of the four groups designated under the EEA and to respond to human rights complaints. These databases provide a clear picture of the workforce and the organization’s ability to respond to complaints. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators:

INDICATORS

5a)Organization collects basic quantitative anti-discrimination and employment equity data.

5b)Organization works at improving its strategic commitment to human rights with a leadership focus.

Level 1 Fact sheets and tools

·       See related document: Human Rights Maturity Model Fact Sheets.


Level 2 – Defined

The organization is considered to have fully reached this level if it has met all of the outcomes of Level 2 and the previous level.

LEVEL 2 FOCUS

The organization follows a structured approach to human rights matters in the workforce and its point-of-service areas. The organization has established anti-discrimination and employment equity policies and procedures, and communicates them to all staff and clients. Human rights principles are built into the organization’s messaging. The organization has dedicated resources to address human rights issues. A human rights performance measurement system exists, and managers throughout the organization are assigned specific responsibilities related to human rights.

Element:  Leadership and Accountability

Outcome 6.   Management is engaged in human rights culture change.

The organization has begun to change its culture by identifying human rights champions, including human rights and employment equity competencies in performance evaluations, and by building hiring and integration strategies (with appropriate resources) into its long-term planning. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators:

INDICATORS

6a)Human rights champions have been identified within management.

6b)Human resources personnel or other resources have human rights responsibilities included in their work objectives.

6c)Organization has introduced employment equity in managers’ job competencies, as well as performance objectives on human rights responsibilities.

6d)Human resources personnel or other resources have been delegated the development of recruitment, hiring and integration strategies to reflect employment equity principles.


Element: Communication and Consultation

Outcome 7.   Anti-discrimination and employment equity principles are built into mainstream communications.

The organization shows its commitment to respect human rights and employment equity in its communications. Staff are aware of relevant policies and procedures and know where to address complaints and who is responsible. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators:

INDICATORS

7a)Organization has communicated to staff regarding who has been designated as human rights champions, as well as who are the responsible officers for anti-discrimination and employment equity.

7b)All staff and management have been provided documentation on organization’s policies and processes related to anti-discrimination and employment equity.

7c)All human rights policies and processes are accessible to all employees on shared drive or in common areas.

Outcome 8.   Consultation is structured and ongoing on all aspects of human rights.

To ensure ongoing dialogue with employees on human rights matters, the organization establishes methods such as a committee, working group, or e-forum. These methods enable employees to share their views on the human rights issues that affect the organization. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

8a)Organization has identified a resource or a forum with a function to consult with employees/employee associations/unions related to employment equity, as well as anti-discrimination.

Element: Alignment of Policies and Processes

Outcome 9.   Organizational anti-discrimination/employment equity policies are implemented with the objective to achieve compliance with the CHRA and the EEA.

The organization’s policies and processes enable it to meet its CHRA and EEA obligations. Responsibility for meeting these obligations is shared among various sectors of the organization. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

9a)Existence of organizational anti-discrimination policies.

9b)Employment equity plan fulfills the requirements of the EEA.

9c)Guidelines and policy directives are in place with regard to employment equity and related processes (e.g. selection, promotion).

Outcome 10.     Formal discrimination complaints process is established.

The organization’s process to handle allegations of discrimination or human rights abuse includes remedial action. Complaints are dealt with in a prompt, transparent and consistent manner. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

10a) Discrimination grievance procedure (where applicable) and discrimination complaint process is accessible (i.e., readily available), timely, transparent and provides for remedies.

Outcome 11.     Additional options/mechanisms for managing human rights issues are explored and tested.

The organization expands its formal complaint process to include prevention measures. New ways to manage and prevent human rights issues are put in place and tested. These ways help to identify problems or resolve issues through alternate means, such as mediation. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

11a) Options providing for the prevention, management and resolution of human rights issues are designed/introduced.

Element: Capacity Building and Resources

Outcome 12.     Organization has adequate capacity and resources to address Level 2 outcomes of each element.

The organization allocates the financial and human resources needed to meet all Level 2 HRMM outcomes. All managers play a role in meeting human rights and employment equity requirements and have access to appropriate training. Information technology systems are in place to gather employment equity data and support the discrimination complaints system. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

12a)    Human rights training is tailored to the specific roles and responsibilities of staff.

12b)    Adequate resources committed to implement the HRMM.

12c)    Organization has an information technology system that can accommodate and support the management of discrimination complaints and the gathering of employment equity data.


Element: Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement

Outcome 13.     Organization is collecting human rights qualitative data.

The organization uses its information technology system to gather data on employment equity and discrimination allegations, to assess the situation and to develop effective action plans. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

13a) Organization has a tool to track data related to discrimination complaints/grievances and employment equity requirements.

13b) Organization works at improving its planning, policies and processes related to human rights with an employee focus.

Level 2 Fact sheets and tools

·       See related document: Human Rights Maturity Model Fact Sheets.


Level 3 – Managed and Routine

The organization is considered to have fully reached this level if it has met all of the outcomes of Level 3 and the previous levels.

LEVEL 3 FOCUS

The organization follows a proactive approach to human rights in the workplace and points-of-service areas — an approach that goes well beyond its legal obligations. Responsibility for creating a human rights culture rests not only with its human resources unit (or other designated resources) but also with operational units. The organization’s business plan includes human rights and commits the resources required to identify, address and prevent human rights issues. Communications and consultations related to human rights are proactive and engage the whole organization, including managers, employees, unions, clients, employers and service providers. The organization gathers and analyzes data to monitor trends and enhance policies and processes.

Element:  Leadership & Accountability

Outcome 14.     Management acts in accordance with their roles and responsibilities regarding human rights.

The organization succeeds in this outcome if all managers, at all levels, are meeting their responsibilities on human rights issues. Operational plans incorporate the human rights of employees and stakeholders into day-to-day business, a process for identifying systemic discrimination issues is in place, and the organization modifies practices and policies which create the barriers. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

14a) Managers and supervisors are meeting performance objectives on human rights responsibilities.

14b) Working units have included appropriate elements of anti-discrimination and/or employment equity within their standard operational plans.

14c) Organization has implemented a process/mechanism to identify systemic discrimination issues.

Element: Communication and Consultation

Outcome 15.     The organization proactively communicates and consults regarding all aspects of human rights and their impacts on the workforce and the workplace.

Communications about human rights and their impacts on the workplace are clear, sustained, two-way and focused on specific changes. The organization has a proactive strategy to communicate and promote its culture change internally. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

15a) Communication strategy on human rights is designed and implemented to reach the whole organization.

Outcome 16.     Employees/employee associations/unions actively promote human rights principles.

Success on this outcome requires that managers and employees collaborate to promote human rights principles, and unions and employee associations commit to participating in the culture change. Employees communicate actively to support human rights principles and the organization consults with external partners to improve services and policies. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

16a) Employees/employee associations/unions and management cooperate and/or support communication on anti-discrimination, employment equity and conflict resolution concepts or initiatives.

16b) Employees/employee associations/unions and management cooperate and/or support training on human rights matters.

Outcome 17.     Organization consults proactively on all aspects of human rights.

The organization engages in meaningful, two-way consultations with clients and external stakeholders about creating a human rights culture. All relevant facets of the organization, including policies, procedures and modes of service delivery, are topics for consultation. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

17a) Organization consults external partners to enhance service delivery and policies.

Element: Alignment of Policies and Processes

Outcome 18.     Proactive multi-disciplinary approach to human rights involving various sectors of the organization is established.

Responsibilities for human rights and employment equity are shared by all managers and employees involved in these matters. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

18a) Involvement by various sectors/business groups/operational units of the organization in fulfilling the employment equity plan.

18b) Involvement by various sectors/business groups/operational units of the organization in establishing and maintaining effective practices for dealing with complaints.


Outcome 19.     Organization ensures that its internal policies and practices reflect human rights principles when applicable.

All sectors of the organization consider human rights and employment equity when drafting and reviewing policies, processes, service delivery models and staffing plans. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator:

INDICATOR

19a) Internal policies take into account human rights when applicable.

Outcome 20.     Organization establishes proactive systems to manage human rights issues.

The organization has processes to prevent, manage and resolve human rights disputes. All members of the organization — management, employees, unions and employee associations — are involved in these processes. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

20a) Organization has implemented a process for the prevention, management and early resolution of human rights disputes.

Element: Capacity Building and Resources

Outcome 21.     Organization has adequate capacity and resources to address Level 3 outcomes of each element.

The organization allocates the financial and human resources needed to meet all Level 3 outcomes. Appropriate training has been provided to all managers and is available to all employees; all operational units play a role in managing human rights and employment equity requirements. To inspire culture change, the organization uses performance objectives, standard operating procedures, informal complaint management systems, communication strategies, and information management and technology. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

21a) Human rights training offered to staff regardless of specific roles and responsibilities.

21b) Organization has tools and resources to implement its employment equity plan and to foster an environment free from discrimination.


Element: Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement

Outcome 22.     Organization develops its human rights performance measurement framework.

The organization gathers and analyzes qualitative information regarding its employment equity program, its human rights responsibilities and its progress on the HRMM. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

22a) Organization is putting in place a performance measurement framework to assess its performance against set anti-discrimination and employment equity objectives/targets.

22b) Organization works at improving its integrated approach to human rights with an employee/citizen/client focus.

Level 3 Fact sheets and tools

·       See related document: Human Rights Maturity Model Fact Sheets.


Level 4 – Predictable and Sustainable

The organization is considered to have fully reached this level if it has met all of the outcomes of Level 4 and the previous levels.

LEVEL 4 FOCUS

Everyone in the organization has a clear and shared responsibility for human rights in the workforce and at point-of-service areas. The organization collaborates on human rights issues with partners and stakeholders, including government, unions, employee associations and other businesses, and with the general public. Human rights considerations are integrated into the daily operations of the organization.

Element:  Leadership and Accountability

Outcome 23.     Human rights roles and responsibilities are understood and are acted upon throughout the organization.

Responsibility for and ownership of the human rights culture in the workplace are widespread; all workplace parties understand their rights and responsibilities and are working to improve the workplace culture of respect as opportunities arise. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

23a) Human rights concepts and principles are incorporated in day-to-day activities and staff routinely engages in behaviours that foster human rights, dignity and equity in the workplace.

23b) Senior leadership ensures that a process/mechanism has been implemented to address systemic issues.

Outcome 24.     Senior leadership ensures organization has built relations with external partners with respect to human rights.

A visible commitment to fostering and sustaining a human rights culture in the workplace turns outward from the organization itself, and senior leadership broadens its focus in order to build productive and durable relationships with external partners. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

24a) Organization has partnerships with a third party to help foster human rights.


Element: Communication and Consultation

Outcome 25.     Organizational communications are filtered through a human rights lens.

All organizational communications incorporate human rights principles such as inclusivity and accessibility. To accommodate those with limited English- and French-language skills, plain language is used whenever possible.  The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

25a) Appreciation for human rights and diversity is built into and practiced by organizational communications.

Outcome 26.     The organization conducts regular and ongoing consultation with external partners/key stakeholders to promote human rights principles.

The organization consults regularly with business and public-sector partners regarding the value of human rights principles. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator:

INDICATOR

26a) Consultation with internal and external stakeholders / partners / designated group members' communities to develop strategies for minimizing complaints/conflicts in the workplace.

Element: Alignment of Policies and Processes

Outcome 27.     Internal and external policies and practices reflect human rights.

The organization’s internal and external policies and practices reflect human rights and are incorporated into the organization’s day-to-day activities. They are sustainable and predictable, consistent with its workplace values and applied within the organization and with external stakeholders. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

27a) Organization ensures that its external policies and practices take into account human rights when applicable.


Outcome 28.     Organization improves its human rights practices through partnerships.

The organization establishes and expands partnerships to improve its human rights practices and policies. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

28a) Partners are involved in initiatives related to human rights. Organization shares promising human rights practices with its partners.

Element: Capacity Building and Resources

Outcome 29. Organization has adequate capacity and resources to address Level 4 outcomes of each element.

The organization shares relevant information and best practices and offers training on trends and HRMM developments to staff at all levels. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

29a) Organization has established or is part of a network of external human rights communities.

29b) Dedicated resources for human rights communication activities and the advancement of the HRMM.

29c) Training on new human rights trends offered to staff.

Element: Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement

Outcome 30.     Organization enhances and shares its monitoring system using an integrated data collection approach.

The organization exchanges best practices for performance measurement with outside organizations and partners. The organization reviews its performance measurement framework regularly to make it more effective, predictable and sustainable. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

30a) Organization shares its results and proven practices and learns from others.

30b) Organization works at improving its integrated approach to human rights with a suppliers/partners focus.

Level 4 Fact sheets and tools

·       See related document: Human Rights Maturity Model Fact Sheets.


Level 5 – Continuously Optimized

The organization is considered to have fully reached this level if it has met all of the outcomes of level 5 and the previous levels. 

LEVEL 5 FOCUS

The organization has achieved a culture of human rights in its workforce and point-of-service areas. All members of the organization—from employees to managers to business partners—share responsibility for respecting and promoting human rights and preventing discrimination. Human rights practices are entirely integrated into daily routines and business practices. The organization promotes human rights beyond its immediate interests and continually monitors performance to enhance its culture.

Element:  Leadership & Accountability

Outcome 31.     Senior leadership has initiated actions to demonstrate its broad commitment to human rights within their community, locally and internationally.

The organization is deeply committed to human rights and shares its experience and expertise with external groups by participating in forums and sponsoring relevant causes. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

31a) Organization promotes human rights principles outside its organization.

Outcome 32.     All levels of the organization share responsibility for human rights within the organization.

The organization implements mechanisms to monitor and promote the HRMM and reports regularly on its progress. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

32a) Organization oversees and promotes continuous improvement on the HRMM.

Element: Communication and Consultation

Outcome 33.     The organization broadly promotes human rights.

The organization promotes human rights in society at large beyond its economic and business interests. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator:

INDICATOR

33a) Organization has implemented initiatives to broadly promote human rights.

Element: Alignment of Policies and Processes

Outcome 34.     The organization ensures that it has policies/practices or initiatives that foster Human Rights in areas beyond its mandate or economic interests.

The organization acts to promote respect for human rights in areas outside its mandate and business interests. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

34a) Organization ensures that it has policies/processes or initiatives that foster human rights in areas beyond its mandate or economic interests.

Element: Capacity Building and Resources

Outcome 35.     Organization has adequate capacity and resources to address Level 5 outcomes of each element.

The organization funds human rights training and promotion, along with other HRMM initiatives. The outcome is further defined by the following indicator: 

INDICATOR

35a) Organization allocates a budget for internal training on ethics and values and for external promotion of human rights.

Element: Evaluation for Performance Measurement and Continuous Improvement

Outcome 36.     Organization incorporates parameters related to the broad promotion of human rights into its monitoring system.

The organization’s performance measurement system incorporates the promotion of human rights. The outcome is further defined by the following indicators: 

INDICATORS

36a) Organization has introduced broader human rights parameters into its monitoring system.

36b) Organization continuously refines its overall efforts for human rights improvement and their impact on organizational accomplishments.

Level 5 Fact sheets and tools

·       See related document: Human Rights Maturity Model Fact Sheets.



HRMM Implementation

Once an organization commits to the idea of using the HRMM, they self-assess their current status using the Commission’s self-assessment workbook. The implementation process is outlined below.

Senior Leadership Commitment

Commitment of senior leadership is the single most important factor in HRMM success. Senior leadership should discuss what successes their organization has experienced, what challenges the organization is facing and what improvement opportunities exist. Once a commitment is made, the organization is ready to move forward.

While the implementation process varies by organization, it typically involves four major steps:

·  Formation of a steering team;

·  Initial self-assessment and gap analysis;

·  Development of an action plan; and

·  Implementation and continuous improvement.

HRMM Steering Team and/or Working group

Four factors influence the success of a HRMM team: commitment, composition, operations and roles and responsibilities of individual members. Appendix A outlines these factors.

The HRMM implementation should begin with the formation of an integrated, multidisciplinary steering committee and/or working group. Senior leadership should select people from a range of organizational units, with varied backgrounds, skills and areas of expertise who have strong interpersonal problem-solving skills. Unions should be involved from the beginning. A dedicated team broadly representing the organization’s various groups fosters the coordination needed to undertake assessments and develop effective action plans. Appendix B offers approaches to the composition and operating plan of a steering team.

Initial Self-Assessment and Gap Analysis

Self-assessment determines the organization’s current HRMM level and identifies initial areas for improvement. The self-assessment does not require validation from the Commission.

See related document: Human Rights Maturity Model Self-Assessment Workbook.

In many cases, a gap analysis follows the initial self-assessment. The gap analysis identifies the indicators, elements and outcomes the organization must complete to reach a specific HRMM level. Following this analysis, the organization’s current HRMM level will be evident.

Developing an Action Plan

The action plan builds on the self-assessment and gap analysis by identifying next steps. To develop the action plan, the team prioritizes the HRMM indicators and outcomes required to progress to the next level. These questions can help guide this effort:

·  How can the organization make progress on this indicator/outcome?

·  What is the most acceptable option for the organization?

·  What support is required to implement this option?

·  Who should be responsible for implementation?

·  What timelines are realistic?

·  How should the team prioritize next steps?

·  How will the team measure success in this area?

Once the plan is complete, the team must secure management approval, then communicate the approved plan within the organization. Progress on each element of the action plan should be measured and communicated.

Implementation and Planning for Continuous Improvement

Once an action plan has been developed and resources identified, it will need to be implemented and monitored. The organization must put into place, modify or improve various policies and practices. This process will evolve continually as successes and setbacks inform practices and policies.


APPENDIX A

Four factors influence the success of an HRMM team: commitment, composition, operations and roles and responsibilities of individual members.

1.    Commitment

1.1.The organization recognizes and accommodates the impacts that participation in the team will have on the workload of individual members. HRMM planning identifies how many hours per week (or month) team members will devote to the project.

1.2.Participation in the team should be optional and candidates have the information they need to make an informed choice. Candidates are briefed on the organization’s vision, the HRMM process and on their expected roles and responsibilities. 

2.    Team Composition

2.1.The team includes members with a variety of skills and aptitudes: expertise in human rights, for instance, and knowledge of the organization’s business goals. Ideal candidates tend to be innovative, organized, committed and neutral.

2.2.The team includes representatives of all major groups within the organization: human resources, policy, legal, program delivery, etc. All team members need not be in the same location — meetings can involve video and audio conferencing.

2.3.Every steering team should have a leader. The leader serves as the team’s primary contact with senior executives, conveying the organization’s vision and reporting on progress. Ideally, the leader is well respected by senior management.

3.    Operations

3.1.HRMM processes, including the self-assessment, are team exercises; delegating the work to a single person creates significant risks.

3.2.The team holds regular meetings and records and publishes minutes. The minutes include decisions taken.

3.3.Each organization determines its own pace for progressing through HRMM levels.

4.    Roles and Responsibilities

4.1.Senior leadership’s role is to support the team, encourage positive change and ensure human rights are a priority.

4.2.Clear, regular communication is crucial to success. The team members inform employees and managers within their respective divisions about the HRMM and the organization’s vision and action plan. Ultimately, team members are not only human rights ambassadors for the organization but agents of change and champions. The team leader provides regular updates on progress to senior management.

4.3.The team leader plans the self-assessment by determining when and how it will take place and by assigning specific tasks, including the tracking and communication of progress.

4.4.The team reviews and analyzes the information collected during the self-assessment and determines the organization’s current HRMM level. See related document: Human Rights Maturity Model Self-Assessment Workbook.

4.5.The team develops a plan for continual improvement. The self-assessment and gap analysis will identify the specific outcomes and indicators that the organization must achieve to progress to the next HRMM level.

APPENDIX B

Steering Team Composition Options

The HRMM pilot project demonstrated that various approaches to the composition and operating plan of a steering team can lead to success. The potential advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are listed below.

Size and Composition Options

Large team with broad representation: Nine or more members representing a cross-section of the organization (management, union, employees)

Potential advantages:

·  Fosters awareness of, and demonstrates organizational commitment to, HRMM throughout the organization.

·  Promotes communication between various levels of the organization.

Potential risks and mitigating strategies:

·  Risk: Lengthy familiarization period as members get used to working together. Mitigating strategy:Team-building workshop will foster unity.

·  Risk: Some members may feel their contributions are unnecessary or of little value. Mitigating strategy:Assign meaningful tasks to small subcommittees to build commitment levels.

·  Risk: Excessive time required to make decisions and achieve consensus. 
Mitigating strategy:Use plenary sessions to make decisions only on larger topics (e.g. HRMM level of organization); assign responsibility for smaller decisions to subcommittees.

Mid-sized team: five-to-seven managers of key areas (human resources, legal, policy) along with senior union official.

Potential advantages:

·  Familiarity with subject matter inspires quick progress.

·  Can create subcommittees or work in plenary.

·  Unlikely to suffer if one member becomes unavailable.

Potential risks and mitigating strategies:

·  None

Small team with advisory committee: two or three members from key areas (e.g. directors of human resources, legal and policy) assisted by an advisory committee of managers and union officials representing other major areas of the organization.

Potential advantages:

·  Familiarity with subject matter inspires quick progress.

·  Small group facilitates decision-making.

Potential risks and mitigating strategies:

·  Risk: Limited opportunities to inform the rest of the organization of the HRMM. Mitigating strategy:Implement communication plan and use advisory committee to disseminate key information.

·  Risk: Team unaware of relevant issues. 
Mitigating strategy:Encourage advisory team to communicate issues to the team.

·  Risk: Members of the team may occasionally be overwhelmed with HRMM-related workload. 
Mitigating strategy:Authorize members of team to assign some of the HRMM work to their subordinates.


Operational Options

Plenary: team works as a unit to complete all tasks.

Potential advantages:

·  Enables team members to acquire deep knowledge of subject matter.

·  Helps identify and address differences of opinion on key points; opportunity to develop problem-solving skills.

Potential disadvantages and offset options:

·  Excessive time required to make decisions and achieve consensus. Use plenary sessions to make decisions only on larger topics (e.g. organization’s HRMM level); assign responsibility for smaller decisions to subcommittees.

·  Conflicting views of some members stalls progress. Provide training in dispute resolution.

·  Slow progress erodes support of senior management in the HRMM process. Ensure that senior management fully understands all of the risks and benefits associated with HRMM processes.

Subcommittee: team assigns major tasks to subcommittees of two or more people.

Potential advantages:

·  Assigning work to subcommittees with relevant expertise and knowledge speeds completion of tasks.

·  Helps identify and address differences of opinion on key points; provides opportunity to develop problem-solving skills.

·  Promotes learning if members of team assign HRMM work to their subordinates.

Potential disadvantages and offset options:

·  Limits enrichment opportunities for members of team. Identify learning goals of team members and assign them subcommittee work that will help them achieve these goals.

·  Some members may become disassociated with elements of the HRMM. Devise plenary sessions to ensure engagement of all members as HRMM elements are presented and reviewed.


[1] Weigand, R, Organizational Diversity, Profits and Returns in U.S. Firms, Problems and Perspectives in Management ,Volume 5, Issue 3 (2007);   Kochan T, Bezrukova K, Ely R, Jackson S, Joshi A, et al. The effects of diversity on business performance: report of the diversity research network. Hum. Resour. Manag. 42:3–21 (2003); McKay, P. F., Avery, D. R., & Morris, M. A. Mean racial-ethnic differences in employee sales performance: The moderating role of diversity climate. Personnel Psychology, 61, 349–375 (2008).   Thomas, K. Diversity dynamics in the workplace. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. (2005).

[2] Bates, M. & Este, D. Creating Workplace Environments that Reflect Human Rights Values,  Prepared by the Cultural Diversity Institute as a joint educational initiative of the federal, provincial and territorial human rights commissions, May 2000.  Accessed athttp://www.albertahumanrights.ab.ca/Pub_CreatingWPEnv.pdf;  RBC Financial Group, The Diversity Advantage:  A Case for Canada’s 21st Century Economy, presented at 10th International Metropolis Conference, Oct 20, 2005, accessed athttp://www.rbc.com/newsroom/pdf/20051020diversity.pdf

[3]A Business Case for Diversity. Prepared by Dr. Jeffrey Gandz, Professor and Associate Dean, Richard Ivey School of Business, The University of Western Ontario

http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/labour/equality/racism/racism_free_init/business_case-e.shtml

[4] The term human rights refers to anti-discrimination (as described in the CHRA), employment equity (as described in the EEA) and diversity.

[5] The term workplace refers to the place where people are employed.

[6]The term workforce refers to the people working for an organization.

 

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